The potential of U.S. grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect

  • 442 Pages
  • 4.82 MB
  • 1597 Downloads
  • English

Lewis Publishers , Boca Raton, Fla
Soils -- Carbon content -- United States, Carbon sequestration, Greenhouse effect, Atmospheric -- United States, Greenhouse gases -- Environmental aspects -- United States, Rangelands -- United S
Other titlesPotential of United States grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect, Potential of US grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect
Statement[edited by] R.F. Follett, J.M. Kimble, R. Lal
ContributionsFollett, R. F. 1939-, Kimble, J. M., Lal, R
Classifications
LC ClassificationsS592.6.C35 P68 2001
The Physical Object
Paginationxxix, 442 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16987465M
ISBN 101566705541
LC Control Number00042832

The Potential of U.S. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect gives you an in-depth look at this possibility. Discover the world's research 16+ million members. Grazing lands represent the largest and most diverse land resource-taking up over half the earth's land surface.

The large area grazing land occupies, its diversity of climates and soils, and the potential to improve its use and productivity all contribute to its importance for sequestering C and mitigating the greenhouse effect and other conditionCited by: The Potential of U.S.

Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect gives you an in-depth look at this possibility. Reviews "The book is well edited and produced, and is accompanied with an appendix of abbreviations used in the text, and a list of SI multipliers Brand: CRC Press.

Get this from a library. The potential of U.S. grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect. [R F Follett; J M Kimble; R Lal;] -- Introduction: the characteristics and extent of U.S.

grazing lands / J.M. Kimble, R.F. Follett, and R. Lal -- A broad-scale perspective on the extent, distribution, and characteristics of U.S. The Potential of U.S. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect - Kindle edition by Follett, Ronald F., Kimble, John M.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Potential of U.S. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the 5/5(1). The Potential of U.S. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect gives you an in-depth look at this possibility.

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Read full article: “The Potential of U.S. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect” Summary: This book is edited by the world’s leading soil scientists, including Rattan Lal of Ohio State University. It describes grazing lands, the areas they occupy, and their important role in sequestering C to help mitigate the greenhouse effect.

Grazing lands represent the largest and most diverse land resource-taking up over half the earth's land surface. The large area grazing land occupies, its diversity of climates and soils, and the potential to improve its use and productivity all contribute to its importance for sequestering C and mitigating the greenhouse effect and other conditions brought about by 3/5(1).

The potential of U.S. grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect. [R F Follett; J M Kimble; R Lal;] -- The Extent, General Characteristics, and Carbon Dynamics of U.S.

Grazing LandsIntroduction-The Characteristics and Extent of U.S. Grazing Lands, J.M. Kimble, R.F. Follett, and R. LalA Broad Scale. soils to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect. Tltle: Potential of United States soils to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect.

Ill. Kimble, J. (John M.) SC35 P67 'l—dc21 This book contains information obtained from authentic and highly regarded sources. Reprinted material is. The potential of US grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect: edited by RF Follett, JM Kimble and R Lal.

Lewis Publishers, Boca Raton, The United States has vast areas of fertile soils that are used as cropland, grazing lands, forestlands, and other uses that are too numerous to mention. In a book on carbon sequestration, The Potential of U.S. Cropland to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect, was published.

The Potential of U.S. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect describes grazing lands, the areas they occupy, and their role in improving the environment. The book gives professionals and students insight into the two crucial issues: shaping policy and targeting research.

The potential of US grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect Smith, Pete This book covers the very timely subject of carbon sequestration in the grazing lands of the USA.

Carbon sequestration in soils was thrust into the political limelight with the signing of the Kyoto Protocol in December Greenhouse effect, Atmospheric-United States. Greenhouse gases-Environmental aspects-United States. Forest soils-United States. Title: Potential of US forest soils to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect.

Title: Potential of United States soils to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect. Kimble, J.

by: Carbon sequestration, the long-term storage of carbon in plants, soils, geologic formations, and the ocean. In response to concerns about climate change resulting from increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere, interest has been drawn to geoengineering techniques such as carbon capture and storage.

Kimble, and R. Lal. (Eds). The Potential of U.S. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect. Lewis Publishers, A CRC Company, Boca Raton, FL. Follett, R.F. Soil carbon sequestration and mitigation of the greenhouse effect.

In Yearbook of Science and Technology -- Annual Companion to the McGraw-Hill. Biosequestration is the capture and storage of the atmospheric greenhouse gas carbon dioxide by continual or enhanced biological processes. This form of carbon sequestration occurs through increased rates of photosynthesis via land-use practices such as reforestation, sustainable forest management, and genetic s and practices exist to enhance soil carbon.

Read full article: “The Potential of U.S. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect“ Summary: This book is edited by the world’s leading.

Follett R.F., Kimble J.M. and Lal R. (eds) The Potential of U. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect. (eds) The Potential of U.S. Forest Soils to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect.

Download The potential of U.S. grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect FB2

CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA. Montagnini F., Nair P.K.R. () Carbon sequestration: An Cited by: Carbon sequestration or carbon dioxide removal (CDR) is the long-term removal, capture or sequestration of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to slow or reverse atmospheric CO2 pollution and to mitigate or reverse global warming.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is naturally captured from the atmosphere through biological, chemical, and physical processes. These changes.

Global Warming & Climate Change. Science Tracer Bullets - Research Guides from the Library of Congress, Science Reference Services. The Potential of U.S. grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect.

Edited by R. Follett, J.

Description The potential of U.S. grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect PDF

Kimble, and R. Lal. Boca Raton, Fla., Lewis Publishers, p. Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide can be lowered either by reducing emissions or by taking carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and storing in terrestrial, oceanic, or freshwater aquatic ecosystems.

A sink is defined as a process or an activity that removes greenhouse gas from the long-term conversion of grassland and forestland to cropland (and. Abstract. Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils is frequently promoted as a practical solution for slowing down the rate of increase of CO 2 in the atmosphere.

Consequently, there is a need to improve our understanding of how land management practices may affect the net removal of greenhouse gases (GHG) from the by: 1.

Details The potential of U.S. grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect PDF

Introduction. Soils that have lost organic carbon through degradation may potentially act as efficient sinks of carbon under the appropriate natural (e.g. climate) and anthropogenic (e.g. land management) conditions (Batjes, ).Grazing lands may have a high carbon sequestration potential if the input of organic matter into soil and reduction of soil organic matter Cited by:   Some of these findings were incorporated in a recent book () prepared on the subject 'The Potential of U.S.

Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect.' This publication has been used by policy makers and land managers to develop legislation and management strategies as it relates to C sequestration and rangeland.

Information about GHG mitigation or contributions from grazing lands (range and pasture) and their soil's health has developed more slowly, perhaps due to a perception that SOC in grazing lands is in equilibrium and stable with time.

However, grazing lands can also be managed to increase SOC (Follett et al., ). Basis for research needsCited by: organic carbon. That citation is a chapter in a book titled ‘‘The Potential of US Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect’’ (Follett et al.

This book provides examples where grazing increases car-bon sequestration compared to no grazing. Beschta et al. () suggest that the economic impacts.

Kimble, J. Advances in models to measure soil carbon: Can soil carbon really be measured. In Rattan Lal, Carlos C. Ceri, Martial Bernoux, Jorge Etchevers, and Eduardo Cerri (ed.) Carbon sequestration in Latin America.

Food Products Press, Binghamton, NY. Extent of privately and publicly owned rangeland in the U.S. in (USDA-NRCS, ).

FIGURE Extent of grazing land as a proportion of total county area and livestock production cattle inventory in the U.S. (one dot¼10, cattle; USGCRP, ). Please see color plate section at the back of the book.

80 SECTION 2 Agricultural Management. Soil carbon sequestration potential of US croplands and. grasslands: Implementing the 4 per Thousand Initiative Potential of US soils to sequester carbon (C) and mitigate climate change. Health and (b) Grazing and Pasture Lands.

These two USDA Building Blocks align closely with the 4PT dec-laration (see figure 1). File Size: KB.The Potential of U.S. Grazing Lands to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect.

Boca Raton, FL: Lewis Publishers Boca Raton, FL: Lewis Publishers 0 Comments.Soil carbon and microbial biomass carbon after 40 years of grazing exclusion in semiarid sagebrush steppe of Wyoming. by Gyami Shrestha, Peter D. Stahl, Larry C. Munn, Elise G. Pendall, George F. Vance and Renduo Zhang In The potential of U.S.

grazing lands to sequester carbon and mitigate greenhouse effect. R. F. Follett, J. M. Kimble.